What to Do If You Aren’t In Love With Your Major

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Stack of textbooks and apple

When you started freshman year, you were sure you wanted to study business. But now you’re in your program and you’re starting to feel restless. This path doesn’t seem right anymore, and your classes are either too challenging or too boring. Does this sound familiar? Realizing that you’re no longer in love with your choice of major can be shocking. But there are a lot of things you can do to help make up your mind on if you should switch or not. Here’s how to get started.

Give It Time

Stress gets the best of any of us. Coursework, activities, exams, family, friends — it can be a lot to deal with when you’re in college. And that feeling of dread or restlessness can be projected on other things in your life. In some cases, that may be your major.

If it’s been a tough semester or you’ve got a lot going on, you may not want to rush to make any changes to your major. Wait until your feelings pass, you take that exam, or you get that apology from your BFF. You may find that you feel more secure about your future when you have a clearer head.

Meet With Your Advisor

Discussing potentially switching majors with your friends or classmates is a start, but it shouldn’t be the only place you go. Your advisor is your best bet. He or she can discuss your academic performance, the requirements of your current program, and alternative majors you may have in mind. Really, they are a one-stop-shop for all things majors!

Be sure to schedule your academic advising appointment ahead of any registration period as their hours fill up quickly. And if you’re talking about a whole change, of course, you’ll want to have time to review the new major’s requirements and see how it fits in with your current schedule and if it will impact graduation time.

See Into the Future

If you’re more worried about your career prospects when you graduate, skip the advisor and talk to your university’s career center. They don’t only do resume reviews. They also provide counseling for those unsure of what their major can do for them. With loads of resources and research, they know what is out there in terms of job prospects.

They can also help you discover where your talents are and if you’re in the right fitting major for your interests. Ask for a career assessment or a personality exam like Meyers-Briggs. The professional staff can review your results and give you feedback on both your characteristics and what makes you tick.

Mix It Up

If you’re seriously considering changing majors, why not try your new choice out first? Next semester, enroll in one of the required courses to see how it feels. It might turn out that you have the same feelings as you do about your current major. On the other hand, it might be the breath of fresh air you need to feel better about your choices.

Another benefit of taking courses outside your current major is that you might find that you miss it. Absence does make the heart grow fonder, and seeing your old major from a new angle may show you that the grass isn’t always greener. Falling out of love with your major can be tough, but by giving your decision time, help, and professional advice, you can make the decision that is right for your future.

Should You Pull All-Nighters to Study?

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Highlighting and studying for the next exam

If you’re the procrastinating type or prefer to study at the last second, all-nighters may be your thing. But studying at night has some major downfalls for even the most dedicated night owls. On the other hand, cramming it all in the morning-of can be just as ineffective. Here’s how you can determine if you should study at night or wait for the morning — and how to maximize your time.

When to Study Til Dawn

Studying in the evening isn’t for the fainthearted. It can be exhausting and leave you reeling when you wake up the next morning. However, if you’ve got the temperament and schedule for it, you might actually be able to pull it off.

The best night students are the ones who have already conditioned their body to push past midnight. You know you’re one if bedtime is nonexistent or you love doing last minute Sudoku puzzles on your phone while your roommate sleeps. If you’ve been consistently doing this, then you’ve probably already trained your body and your mind to process information at a higher level late at night.

However, before you pick the evening, you’ll need to look at the clock. Your body needs at least seven hours of productive sleep to retain memory and have decent recall speeds. Any less and you’ll be dragging your feet. So, in other words, pulling an all-nighter for an 8 AM exam is not going to work in your favor. A 3 PM quiz, on the other hand, may just work with that sporadic sleep schedule.

If you’re going to go until the early morning, be sure you do it right. Avoid studying in bed or on a comfy chair you could potentially fall asleep on. Take breaks to move around or find new areas to study at. Drink your coffee, tea, or caffeinated soda early in your study session. And try smell techniques like with smelling lavender-scented essential oils to keep your mind alert all night long.

Note cards are one of the best studying tools

When to Leave It Til Morning Of

The morning of a test is a pretty risky choice, but sometimes it just happens. Whether you crash trying to stay up all-night or you just prefer to go from sunrise till class starts, those essential, last-minute study sessions sneak up on you.

Champion morning-study students have a few things in common. For one, they are regimented and know how to manage their time. You may be this type of person if you’re up early for a morning walk at the same time every morning. Morning studiers are also more visual learners who can process information quickly with items like flashcards or sample exams.

When deciding between night and morning, again consider your schedule. Hopefully, you’re well-rested so excessive drowsiness isn’t an issue. That’s a big win for morning studying. If you can commit to getting to bed early the night before, the morning might be the best time to study. You’ll also want to have at least one solid hour before your test and some time for fueling with a healthy breakfast.

If you want to pick the morning, it’s more about how you cram than when. Visual aids like flashcards or even simple slide shows work best while you’re still waking up. Singing songs or making up anagrams also stick in your mind for last-minute crams. Finally, don’t forget to move frequently and to break up studying into 25-30 minute sessions with 5-10 minute breaks in between so you can reset your brain before you hit the exam. Ultimately, whether you study at night or during the day, you can ace that exam if you know how your body and mind best works.

Parent’s Corner: Thanksgiving Break

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University campus on break

We have a lot to be thankful for this season — but nothing greater than for college-aged children coming home. Thanksgiving break is the perfect time to check in on college freshman. From gauging how they’re doing mentally or working out a plan on how to get them through the end of the semester, here’s how you can open up lines of communication, watch for any red flags, and help your freshman succeed.

Before the Break Starts

One of the worst mistakes you can make as a parent is to put too much pressure on your student before they’ve even left for home. Sure, you want to remind them to pack a sweater or try to convince them that flying is better than driving. But by nagging or upping their anxiety, they’ll look less forward to being with you.

Instead, try to remember that their break is meant to be a relaxing, easy going time. As adults, they should be allowed to make their own decisions, including mistakes. Let them lead the ship.

Upon Arrival

Depending on how far they have traveled, the first night may not be the best to judge their mental state or have a heart-to-heart. Allow the first day to be a quiet time. On the second day (or after they’ve settled in), ask them open-ended, nonjudgmental questions about school. For example: “You mentioned you have a tough schedule coming up next semester. What classes are you excited for?”

It can be tempting to slip in a few, “When I was in college…” stories, but for the most part, those are probably not helpful. Instead, practice active and patient listening skills. Talk less than them, use shorter sentences when they are replying, and allow them to vent or talk out a problem.

When Celebrating

Every student is different, but many freshmen are more humble about their accomplishments than their parents. Thanksgiving dinner with the extended family isn’t the time to shout out their great GPA or that they joined a sorority. Let them share the good news themselves!

In addition, don’t be offended if they’ve become guarded or want to keep holidays simple and small. Be open to changing plans.

parents enjoying time with their child over break

Before Heading Back to School

This is when red flags usually pop up. If a student talks about not wanting to go back, you know it might be time for a heart-to-heart or even an intervention. But more subtle signs that your student might be anxious include avoiding discussing next semester plans, asking for money, evading questions about their social life, or feeling a drastic shift in personality.

As parents of an adult, you can’t force your college student into any decision — even if the decision is in their best interest. However, you can offer your support and love. If your child does express fears that college isn’t working for them, listen without losing your temper. Sometimes all they need is a springboard. Other times, they want a person to tell them that they are there for them no matter the outcome. Luckily, if you have this talk before they leave, you can work out a game plan for the rest of the semester.

Once They’ve Returned

Even if you didn’t see any potential issues in your child, use post-break upswings in a mood to establish a connection when they’re on campus. Set up a calling schedule, send a care package or gift, and check in on details they discussed with (such as a professor they dislike or an internship they were applying to). They’ll love knowing you were listening to them just as much you’ll love that they opened up to you.

How to Ensure that You Enjoy Thanksgiving Break

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Thanksgiving Table Spread

Thanksgiving is just around the corner, and we couldn’t be more excited. A short break is all we need to recharge our batteries before our final exams and get some much-needed home cooking. But breaks can be stressful too. With only a limited time to share with family and friends, you might find yourself wishing you were back at school. These seven tips will help ensure that you enjoy your Thanksgiving break and make the most of your time off.

1.     Set Your Expectations

Before you get on the plane or head out for home, be sure your parents are clear on what they can expect from you. This is especially important if you’re a freshman coming home for the first time since moving into the residence halls. You’ll want to let them know in advance if you’ve made plans with your friends or if you plan on spending your time locked up at a library to finish a term paper. Open lines of communication will save you the anxiety of your parents not being on board with your break plans.

2.     Schedule In Time for Yourself

This one is important for everyone. Even if you’ve had a blow-off semester, make time for yourself. Splurge on a mani-pedi, catch up on your favorite TV shows or go see a movie (even if you do it alone). Without a roommate to bug you, classes to get you up in the morning, and clubs to fill up your schedule, you can easily recharge if you plan ahead.

3.     Avoid Toxic Relationships

It can be tempting to go back to the people you have established relationships with who drive you crazy. This may be an old friend from high school, an ex, or a family member. When possible, don’t let these people ruin your break by giving them your precious time. Limit or cut off all interactions. Eventually, they will understand or change their ways.

4.     Plan for Some Wednesday (and Friday) Fun

The night before Thanksgiving has become a bonafide holiday in itself. It’s a day to get together with your friends, unwind, and give thanks for non-blood relatives. And of course, there’s Black Friday which is sacred for shoppers. But here’s the thing — if you’re not into either type of get-togethers or activities, just say no. Remember that this is your break and you’re entitled to not participate.

Enjoying the comforts of home on break

5.     Enjoy the Luxuries of Home

If you don’t have the budget to pamper yourself on break, you can still get the same kind of feel right back at home. Take a long bath (and add bubbles). Sleep on a comfortable, full-size bed. Bake your favorite comfort food dessert. Watch the big game on a large screen TV. These little things go a long way of refreshing your mood.

6.     Pencil in School Time, If Needed

Yes, we’re talking breaks, but if you need study time, you best plan for study time. Thanksgiving break, in particular, moves fast, and before you know it, you’re back at school taking exams. In the midst of turkey, football games, and shopping, force yourself to buckle down and get your school work or studying done. Even 20-minute sessions can go a long way and won’t interfere if you plan it at the right time.

7.     Know Where Your Priorities Lie

Everyone experiences breaks a different way. Some love being active and busy. Others want to sit around with a book and a candle. Whatever your style is, make it a priority. Don’t listen to what anyone has to say on how you should best use your time. This break is your break, and you should be thankful for it.

Layering Basics as the Temperature Drops

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the jacket and scarf combo. A staple for colder months

The cold is finally here, and we’re pulling out all our winter gear and clothing. From stylish sweaters to chic blazers and coats, we’re ready to rock the fall and winter wardrobes. But a fall outfit can go cold fast if you don’t know how to rock the multiple garment look. That’s why we’ve created this list of layering basics so you can stay warm and stylish at the same time.

1.     Master the Double Roll Sleeves

Long sleeves that hang over your wrist are the worst. It makes you look sloppy and not put together. But this fashion faux pas is hard to prevent if you don’t have model-length arms. Instead of looking less than your best, learn how to do the double roll sleeves. Start by unbuttoning any buttons. Then, turn the cuff inside out and fold back once. Use the length of the cuff to determine how wide to make the second roll, which should be near your elbow.

2.     Keep Your Whites Crisp

One of our favorite classic looks is a white t-shirt under a pop of color sweater or a great flannel shirt. The only downside is that white doesn’t stay white for long. Even if you’re not using your t-shirt or tank to work out in, every day, wear and tear can make this look go from neat, to cheap in seconds. Be sure to do a quick bleach bath of your whites about once every other month or so. That, or buy cheap and resign yourself to buying replacements when necessary.

3.     Know Your Textures

The varying of textures is an important part of any stylish outfit. Pairing wool with wool or cotton with cotton isn’t very fashionable, and it can come across as boring or lazy. Try mixing a leather trench with a polyester tank, a fuzzy sweater with a silk blouse, or ripped jeans with a structured flannel and undershirt.

Cardigan, jeans, and boots. A cold weather staple

4.     Add Layers With Oversized Scarves

Scarves have been making a comeback for years now, but they can’t get any hotter this season! While thin or infinity scarves were a thing last fall, this year is all about long, thick, and tri-point style is what you need to be rocking. The best thing about larger scarves is that you can make an entire layer out of them! Add them to a simple long sleeve shirt or tuck them neatly under a casual coat for a daytime look everyone on campus will love.

5.     Avoid Baggy

Oversized is the look to have this year, but it can be tempting to do too much on a smaller frame. The only way to make loose work is to understand how to balance big and fitted. Go with a tunic style dress and add a structured cardigan with pleats or leather cuffs. If you’re wearing gaucho style pants, make sure your layers on top are more fitted to your body to balance the silhouette.

6.     Fit is Key

No matter what you’re wearing, you need to be sure it actually fits. We’ve already talked too big, but an even worse mistake is squeezing into a sweater or jacket that’s too small. Buttons should sit flat, zippers should make it to the top, and fabric shouldn’t pull around your waist or chest. Before you buy or pick out of your closet, do a “sit, stand, and move” test in front of your mirror to make sure everything looks just right on your body.

With these layering basics, you will be ready to tackle those cold mornings and late nights with exceptional style!

Read This if You’re Having a Hard Time Making Friends in College

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Group of girls walking together on an adventure

You’ve made it halfway through the semester, so it probably seems like friend groups have already been established. But if you’re not feeling the love, don’t worry! Making new friends in college can be tough — much harder than in elementary or even high school. It’s totally normal to feel left out or alone when you’re at a new school. If you’re having a hard time making friends in college, we’ve got advice for you to help you establish a new friend group and build some great relationships.

Open Your Doors

One of the coolest parts of college is that, at most schools, dorms encourage an ‘open doors’ atmosphere. In other words, leave your dorm room door open and decorate. Dress up your room, get a cool focal feature, do something neat and fun with your door… whatever you can think of to draw attention to your space. The more open you are, the more likely friends will come to you!

Two friends after their climb

Join the Club

If you don’t want to be isolated, get involved! Find a club that interests you and fits your schedule. Don’t see anything that’s at your level? Look into forming your own group! It could be tabletop gaming or a group to travel into the city and watch plays. Think of what you love and what you want your friends to want to love too and go from there.

If it’s too hard to form an official club, you can always use Facebook events. Advertise around campus and invite your fellow students to join your group. Once in, start some events and see what happens. Even if only one person comes, it’s a win!

Volunteer Your Friend Time

If you’ve got a big heart, you’ll probably want to hang with like, loving minds. Volunteering for causes you care about is a great way to get out there and introduce yourself to new people. From walking dogs at an animal shelter to packaging goods for the holidays, there are endless opportunities for college students to get together, do some good, and build friendships.

Bond Over Food

For introverts, this may be the hardest piece of advice, but sometimes making friends starts with you initiating it. But it doesn’t have to be the terrifying, “Hey! Let’s be friends!” convo. Instead, it could be a simple, “I’m hungry. Are you heading to the cafeteria? If so, can I tag along?” If you’ve got the cash, you can also ask to buy a person a coffee in exchange for help with a difficult class or to talk a professor that’s annoying you. Food is an instant bonder.

Team meeting for group project with coffee

Embrace Group Projects

Is there anything worse than group projects? Probably not. But instead of groaning and whining, look at group work as an opportunity to open yourself up to others. It starts with being a great partner by pulling your weight, making time for the assignment, and listening to other’s opinions. Afterwards, you can all go out and celebrate being done with shared assignments.

Be Yourself Every Day

When you’re not great at putting yourself out there, it can be tempting to want to change your look or personality. But that’s a mistake. Who you are inside is who you should be embracing. People who can’t see how wonderful and great you are are missing out — not you. Continue to be out there, open to new experiences, and positive and the right friends will find you.

College can also be a time to redefine yourself. If you’re nervous or scared in social situations, it is okay. Chances are that many of the people there are as well. Once you are able to do it the first time, it will feel amazing and you will want to continue putting yourself out there. Soon, you will be the talk of the dorm halls!

The Nine Things Every College Student Should Have On Their Desk

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Female student taking notes from a book at library.

All you need is a computer, right? Wrong! Unlike high school or living with your parents, office supplies do not magically appear. Living on your own means stocking up on essential desk items. To make your shopping list easier, we’ve come up with nine things every college student should have on their desk in order to get through the rest of the semester.

     1. Stapler and Staples

Here’s a lesson all freshman learn real fast — your teacher will not have a stapler on them, and they will expect you to turn in stapled copies of your twenty-page paper! Come prepared by having a stapler and extra staples at your deskside whenever you need it.

     2. Printer, Paper, and Ink

Sure, you could print at the library, but that’s going to cost you, and there’s no guarantee the library will be open when you need it. A small-sized printer can run you around $30 on sale and ink can be cheap if you subscribe to regular refills.

     3. Pen and Pencils

We love the convenience of a computer, but you have to have a pen on you at all times. There’s no telling when you’ll want to make a quick note or write a letter yourself. And pencils are essential for majors that require a lot of drafting or revisiting of work — such as musicians, artists, engineers, mathematicians, architects, etc.

4. Paperclips

Like staples, you need to keep your paper in order or they’ll become a mess on your desk. And who wants that? With paperclips or larger file clips, attach and go. No fuss, reusable, and cheap to buy — you have no excuses not to have a small supply.

Planner with post it notes and highlighters

5. Sticky Notes or Journals

Sticky notes are great for telling your roommate to pick up more milk or that they need to clean their side of the room. But when you really want to get something out, a journal is a must-have. Check out these school-themed journals if you really want to impress.

6. Stamps and Stationery

Sending a letter may seem so old fashioned, but thank yous written by hand are impressive and classy. Grab a stack of cards, like these vintage university ones, for when the occasion arises. And don’t forget Forever stamps from the post office.

7. Organizer

You’ve got the little things down, but what about where to put it all? An organizer for the tiny desk objects that get all over the place can be a lifesaver — especially when you’ve got five minutes till class starts and you can’t find your favorite pen.

desk lamp illuminating

8. Desk Lamp

Your desk may come with a lamp attachment already, but those industrial bulbs can lead to migraines or poor study habits. Find one that matches your style and has the right kind of light for your work. This dimmable, portable one is the perfect size and look for most college students’ needs.

9. Power Cord

While technically for under the desk, a safe power cord that can support your laptop, printer, chargers, and a lamp cannot be forgotten. Get one that has a surge protector in case of electricity going out.

If you have these nine items, and a few more that we may have missed, you’ll be ready to tackle those study sessions and ace all your exams!

Move-In Checklist for Girls

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College Checklist for Girls

 

College may seem far off in the distance, but the reality is there’s only one year left. That means it’s time to start talking dorm rooms. And of course, figuring out your style and making sure you have the essentials ready to go is an absolute must. This OCM shopping list is the only one you’ll need. Here’s a breakdown of everything that’s on the move-in checklist for girls.

Bedding

Truth be told, dorm beds are kind of miserable no matter where you go to school. It’s almost universal that you’ll need a few things to make your sleeping space comfy. The first is the right kind of bedding. Extra-long sheets, comforter/quilt, and pillows are the basics. But also consider investing in a great mattress pad if you’re worried about a bad back or a thin mattress.

Bath

Communal bathrooms can be intimidating, but they’re a breeze once you’ve got the right gear. Of course, you’ll want your beauty products and favorite shampoos and soaps. We say splurge and get the best to make your shower experience more luxurious. What you really need is a pair or two of flip flops, a shower caddy to carry it all in, and a set of durable towels.

Home Essentials

Colleges do not give their students cleaning services for their rooms — you’re in charge of that. This means you need to stock up on cleaning supplies and gear. Broom or a sweeper are great to have handy, as well as paper towels and some basic sanitizing wipes.

Out of Sight

Small spaces means getting creative with your storage. Under the bed boxes are crucial, as are closet organizers that hang on the door. Trunks are great for being decor, seating, and storage, but you can also consider ottomans with storage built in as an option.

Dorm Cooking

Believe it or not, but you can cook when you’re living in the dorms. Most come with a small, communal kitchenette, and you’ll want a fridge and/or microwave for yourself. That means you’ll also need a few basics — pot, pan, mixing and measuring bowls, containers, mugs, plates, silverware, etc.

Desk Supplies

Keep yourself organized with everything you need — staplers, paperclips, pens, and pencils, together in a sturdy box or desk organizer. You may also want to invest in the must-haves of studying, like highlighters, notecards, notebooks, and other portable items you can take to and from class and study sessions.

Technology

A laptop or at least a tablet with a portable keyboard should be at the top of your list; it’s an essential in the digital age. But don’t miss out on other essentials like a personal printer, a surge protector, extra batteries, and a carrying case. A TV in your dorm is also a great addition that will let you have movie nights or just “veg,” and a pair of noise-canceling headphones will keep you sane if you get a roommate who snores.

Decorating

Now this category is where you can have some fun! Mix in some touches from home (like a favorite throw pillow or a picture of your BFFs) and add in some new, adult items like a potted plant or a gorgeous vintage mirror. The trick is to come up with a theme or particular style and work with it until it feels like home.  

Extra Essentials

Some things don’t fit into categories but are totally necessary. We’re thinking of first aid kits, umbrellas, lockboxes, and other frequently used items. Think about what you use around your house and add it to this category. You may be surprised what you need — and what you can leave behind.

Parents Corner- How Often You Should Check-In

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College Student stressed over textbook

Sending your child off to college can be an emotional time for everyone involved. As a parent, it can be especially hard to get into a routine of not having the student around. Setting boundaries and establishing rituals is important in maintaining healthy relationships with college-aged kids. Here’s how you can determine how often you should check in based on your student’s personality or situation.

The Homesickness Factor

One of the most normal phases of freshman year is going through some periods of homesickness. Even the toughest, adventurous, or independent students may go through this when first moving into dorms. Being in a stressful environment or having a lack of familial support only exaggerates it.

If your child is showing signs of homesickness, it may be tempting to increase your contact or encourage them to come home. However, it can harm the student if you tell them that you miss them, increase your phone calls, or pressure them to visit in order to feel better. Instead, ease back, encourage them to get out, and praise them when they find something new to love about living on their own. Set up weekly calls instead of nightly, and help them book one trip home soon so they have something to look forward to.

The Close-to-Homebody

When we think of living on campus, we think of living more than a few hours away from home. Today, however, many students choose to live in dorms not far from where they grew up which can make it hard to determine how often parents should initiate calls or visits.

For homebodies who frequently visit, making calls short and to-the-point will help establish boundaries. You want the student to be independent (and do their own laundry), so over communicating can make them feel like they’ve never left. And it can encourage them to treat dorm life like they are commuting instead of living on their own.

The Long-Distance Students

One of the trickier parent-student situations is when a child decides to live on campus hours away from parents. In this case, it can be terrifying to ease back and let a student be on their own without checking in often.

In this case, it’s important to be honest and have a conversation early on what your student wants and what you expect in terms of them reaching out to you. Depending on your situation (such as if you’re paying their tuition or not), you may be able to call the shots. But as parents of adults, it’s important to remember that your student may not be on board with daily phone calls and video chats. Instead, ask them what they feel is appropriate and find common ground. Same goes for visits.

The Solo Student 

A student who goes dark can be scary for parents. When you don’t know what they are doing or how they are feeling, it can be difficult to adjust to the new norm. But in many cases, a student wanting space is demonstrating to themselves and you that they are setting boundaries.

Using the same advice for long distance students, open the conversation. Ask them how much is too much when it comes to calls or texts. Ask if they prefer one way of getting a hold of them over the other. Suggest a code word for emergencies or a set day to have a check-in chat. They’ll love that you are respecting their wishes and you’ll feel better having a set routine to follow.

Fall Drinks you can Make in your Dorm Room

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Foggy autumn morning

Fall is for warm flannel blankets, fashionable checkerboard patterns, snuggling up by a cozy fire, and enjoying a frothy, spiced drink. If you’re not careful, you can end up spending a fortune at the grocery store or coffee shop on artisan or specialty drinks. Instead, craft your own fall drinks by trying one of these three amazing fall drink recipes — which you can easily make in your own dorm room!

apple hanging next to cider jar

Homemade Apple Cider

You don’t need an apple press or a ton of time to make apple cider. Really, all you need to do is have access to a large pot and a stove to make this recipe happen. Experiment with different varieties of apples and a number of spices until you find the recipe that works for you. We guarantee it’s much better than store-bought versions!

 Ingredients:

  • 10-12 apples, sliced or in large chunks
  • 1 ½ tbsp. cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp. allspice
  • ½ cup sugar

 Directions:

  • Pour apples into a large pot and cover with 2-3 inches of water
  • Add the cinnamon, allspice, and sugar until mixed completely
  • Bring to a boil and keep it there for an hour
  • Cover the pot and let simmer for two hours
  • Strain the apple cider until all of the chunks are out and stir to ensure it’s mixed properly. Serve warm or cool.

Pumpkin Spice Latte in glass

DIY Pumpkin Spiced Latte

At $4 a cup, we’ll pass on Starbucks! This homemade version is easy and fast, and you can serve it up at a party or tailgate! The only equipment you’ll need is a coffee maker, a blender (or hand mixer), and a microwave. It’s so simple and delicious, and this recipe makes 3 mugs so you can share with your roomies!

 Ingredients:

  • 3 cups milk
  • 3 tsp. sugar
  • 1 tsp. pumpkin spice
  • ½ tsp. vanilla extract
  • 6-8 oz. coffee
  • Whipped cream (as desired)

 Directions:

  • Warm milk in microwave at ten-second intervals until warm
  • Place warmed milk, sugar, pumpkin spice, and vanilla in a blender and blend, or hand mix until mixture is foamy
  • Divide milk mixture among 3 cups
  • Add coffee and stir gently for a few seconds
  • Add whip cream and any extra pumpkin spice as garnish

Tailgating punch with fall inspired flavors

Tailgaters Punch

When you need a tasty, crowd-pleasing drink fast, you could stick with one of those pre-prepared sugar-laden fruit punch drinks, or even DIY the typically bland, overdone homemade kind. But none of those really says fall — definitely not like this seasonal version. Warm and full of apple and honey, it’s just what you need for cooler mornings and afternoons without missing out on that more festive feel. Plus, it pairs perfectly with tailgating foods like hamburgers, hot dogs, and BBQ.

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups hot black tea
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • ½ cup lemon juice
  • 4 cups cranberry juice
  • 4 cups apple juice or apple cider
  • 3 cups orange juice, pulp-free
  • 4 cinnamon sticks

Directions:

  • Blend and stir all ingredients in large pot
  • Bring mixture to boil
  • Lower temperature and allow to simmer for 1-2 hours
  • Remove cinnamon sticks and serve warm or cold

These three recipes will help you sip on fall flavors all season long, without breaking your budget. Let us know which ones you make and what your favorite turns out to be!