Student Spotlight: How Cornell Fostered Yorango’s Innovation & Facilitated Further Growth

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Yorango College Entrepreneurs

Yorango was launched in late 2012 by Adam Kirsch of Cornell University. The initial intent was to create a housing platform that was a better alternative to the sketchy, outdated classifieds that many typically rely on in the housing market. Over time, Adam Kirsch tells us, the scope of Yorango’s offerings transformed. “While we started off dealing with just listings, it was because it was what we knew as students. We were renting, our friends were renting, it was easy to grasp that we needed really good way to find a place or post a sublet,” Kirsch explained. They then spoke with hundreds of tenants and landlords to recognize a greater need in the housing market.

Business Growth

“After solving that problem for thousands of renters in the Ithaca area, we began work on our SaaS, which solves a number of shared problems affecting both tenants and the landlord or property manager responsible for the property. This platform brings organization and efficiency to the rental process, from allowing tenants to pay rent and sign leases online to empowering landlords to track maintenance effectively from their phone or computer,” Kirsch explained. Yorango now offers three total services: a listings platform for leases and sublets, a property management Software as a Service, and the Yorango Housing Network. The Yorango Housing Network is a program that works to connect graduating students with trusted brokers and landlords in new cities. Yorango’s growth is the culmination of both internal and external factors.

“Yorango’s recent product expansion can be largely attributed to the technical leadership of the company’s CTO, Anton Gilgur. A startup veteran, Gilgur’s energy and experience was instrumental in taking Yorango beyond listings and into broader applications of the technology to build better landlord-tenant relationships.” Kirsch also explained of their growth.

Yorango Housing Platform

“Our recent expansions – the SaaS and Yorango Housing Network – reflect hours upon hours of talking to prospective users and understanding the challenges they face in their business and their life, and us using our skills as entrepreneurs to address those problems,” said Kirsch of the growing pains of a startup. “The biggest challenge in launching Yorango was really getting to know customer needs. You can’t just declare a problem exists unless you intimately know it yourself,” he added.

Specifically, Yorango recently launched maintenance software on their for their property management product. Tenants, who could previously make online payments through the platform, are now also able to are now able to digitally file any maintenance requests, which will automatically and immediately notify their landlord or property manager. The system then allows both tenants and landlords to track and update the progress of a specific maintenance request. This especially offers some ease of use for landlords, as it merges all requests for maintenance across all of their properties listed on Yorango.

 Yorango Landlord Platform

Balancing School with a Startup

As challenging as it was to balance school with a startup, what Kirsch described as sometimes “[needing] to burn the candle at both ends” was ultimately a worthwhile experience. His school greatly fostered his creativity and provided ample resources as well. “Cornell has a fantastic infrastructure for supporting student companies, and the eLab accelerator program meant that we could receive coaching, credit and capital as we built our business. We also used the Cornell-affiliated Life Changing Labs incubator for additional support, and were headquartered in what is now known as the eHub, a co-working space where Cornell students do entrepreneurship. Countless students, faculty, staff and alumni support us in our endeavor,” Kirsch said. According to The Cornell Sun, eHub is a 5,000 square foot working space, boasting an open layout that fosters startup innovation.

Advice for Starting a Business in College

For students looking to follow in his footsteps, Kirsch offers the following three pieces of advice:

  1. Make sure you’re solving a real problem or creating something truly amazing. Talk to 100 prospective customers, ideally strangers, and confirm your product is either going to drastically improve their life or solve a real problem they face. Don’t lead them into an answer either – ask “What sucks?” and see if your solution addresses that opportunity.
  2. Don’t wait to be great. If you’re well-suited to solve a problem now, do it.
  3. Leverage the “free consultants” all around you – this means faculty, staff and students at your school. Odds are more than one has experience in an area you need help in, and they’re often more than willing to help someone at their college or university.

What the Future Holds for Yorango

“Growth is definitely top-of-mind for us right now,” Kirsch underscored. “While we’re quite happy with the success of our listings platform, we know we can create even more value going forward. That’s why we’re going all out on the SaaS, so Yorango can address your rental needs at any time of the year, not just when you’re looking, and also pioneering the Housing Network in select markets, enabling our alumni users to transition to their new hometowns with our support.”

To learn more about Yorango’s offerings, reach out at contact@yorango.com or visit www.yorango.com

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Katherine Carpenter

Katherine Carpenter

Hi I'm Katherine! I love DIY projects, especially ones that I can use to make my dorm room pop! My favorite flavor of ice cream is mint chocolate chip, especially when it's on a cone. I love hanging out with my sorority sisters and giving back to the community. Always remember to live, laugh and love!