Help! My Parents Don’t Want Me to Rush

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Making the decision to rush a sorority is not one to take lightly. You will likely need the support (emotionally and financially) from your parents. If your parents don’t agree with your decision to join, you may be facing an even bigger obstacle. However, there are a few easy steps you can take to get your parents on your side and excited for your rush.

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1.   Figure Out Their Fears

If your parents don’t want you to join a sorority, it’s most likely because they have a misunderstanding of what it is like to be a sister or brother. That’s why it’s important to get to the bottom of why they dislike the plan. Knowing their personal reasons why will help you get through the next steps.

2.   Give Them the Details

Sororities and fraternities won’t just let you in without disclosing their expectations and requirements. For some, you may have to maintain a certain GPA. Others require that you pay a certain fee or live in a house. Before you bust out with, “Hey mom, I’m rushing!” make sure you are prepared with all the information you can get your hands on. If you can erase their fears by demonstrating that the sorority provides a study group and tutors or that the house allow you to live on campus instead of in a home, you’re more likely to get them on your side.

3.   Introduce Them to an Alumni

Alumni play a very important role in the rushing process. Usually, former sisters and brothers attend recruitment and rush events as a way to show off their success after college. If you have an organization you really love, don’t be afraid to ask them to help you out by having them send your parents an email or to even call them.

4.   Promise to be Upfront

Unfortunately, news stories about pledges going through initiation hazing have many parents on edge about their own children rushing. In many cases, the parents of the victims had no idea what was going on because their children didn’t tell them they were even pledging. Guarantee them that you know how to protect yourself in case you get into a bad situation, and be open to their personal opinions on the situation. Promise to check in every week or more and to email them if you have an important event or party with the details.

5.   Make an Activity Schedule

If your parents are focused on your maintaining your grades once you pledge, you’ll need to show them you can handle the extra load. Create a sample calendar with all of your classes, study times, tutoring sessions, sororityy meetings, and volunteer requirements. Then, go through each item and explain how they can fit in well together. After all, the point of rushing a sorority or fraternity is to not only make friends, but to enhance your college experience. By showing your parents how the organization will work for you, you can assuage their fears and get them on your side.